Learning the Teensy LC: Input Capture

Teensy LC input capture test

As a third step to learning the Teensy LC, I decided to tackle input capture. I discovered that there is no separate interrupt vector for input capture; it is the same vector used by the timer interrupt. This means that if we are looking for a timer overflow event as well as a pin change for input capture, we must check for that specific interrupt flag within the interrupt service routine (ISR). Continue reading

Learning the Teensy LC: Interrupt Service Routines

Custom ISR in the Teensy LC

As a follow-on to my PWM experiments, I wanted to create a custom interrupt service routine (ISR) in the Teensy LC. This would be similar to using the ISR() macro in an ATmega-based Arduino. Because the ARM has different vectors (and some other weird/cool things, like configurable interrupt priority levels), I knew the normal ATmega vectors would not work. Luckily, PJRC created a set of vectors to work with the Teensy, which can be found in this code.

You don’t need any additional components for this example. We are just going to flash the on-board LED using our custom ISR. Continue reading

Learning the Teensy LC: Manual PWM

Teensy_LC_PWM

I’m in the process of learning how to use the Teensy LC, which is the newest Arduino-compatible module from PJRC. It is built around the MKL26Z64VFT4 (ARM Cortex-M0+), which can be had for around $2.20 for 100 (according to Digi-Key). I really like the microcontroller, as it is much more powerful than the ubiquitous ATmega 328p (not that I don’t like the 328p) for about the same price.

The awesome people at PJRC have gone through the process of creating a set of libraries and hardware definitions so that you can program the entire Teensy line from Arduino. It is quite slick, and if you have not tried it yet, I suggest you give it a shot. It does require installing some software on top of the Arduino IDE, but it opens up the world of ARM to Arduino users.

Because I have decided to use the Teensy LC (or, more specifically, the MKL26Z64VFT4) for a personal project, I wanted to learn how to manually set up interrupts. As it turns out, ARM interrupts are more complicated than the interrupts found in most ATmega processors. More importantly, I wanted to learn how to do this from the Arduino IDE (because reasons). PJRC still has many of the labels for registers and bit fields set to the Teensy 3.1, which work well enough for the Teensy LC, but might not be correct. Continue reading

How To Give the Olimex A13-OLinuXino-MICRO a Static IP Address

If you’ve been following along, you should have a basic Debian Linux installation on your Olimex A13-OLinuXino-MICRO board and able to connect to WiFi. Make sure that the SSID and WPA password settings are correct in the /etc/wpa_supplicant/wpa_supplicant.conf file. See my guide on setting up WiFi with the A13-OLinuXino-MICRO and scroll down to the section on configuring wpa_supplicant.

Assuming you’re able to login to the OLinuXino and connect to a WiFi access point, we can change the default of DHCP to a static IP address. Continue reading

Getting WiFi Working on the A13-OLinuXino-MICRO

This tutorial will guide you through setting up WiFi on the A13-OLinuXino-MICRO board and connecting to a WPA-enabled network. Because the MICRO board has no wired Ethernet, we’re going to have to download Debian packages for wpa_supplicant on the host machine and install them on the MICRO. Continue reading

Configure an SD Card Image for Better Compression

If you’re working on a Linux image for your single board computer (e.g. Raspberry Pi, OlinuXino, BeagleBone Black, etc.) and you notice that the compression of gzip sucks for the backup image, you need to re-format the SD card. For example, I created a Debian image on a card, which was partitioned for the whole 4GB. Now, we know that only the first few megabytes will be used, and the rest will be empty. However, if you’ve previously used the card (or you might see this with a factory-fresh card), the rest of the card will not be zeros. This will result in a poor compression ratio. My 4GB compressed to 3.1GB. Not great. Continue reading

Getting Started with the Olimex A13-OLinuXino-MICRO

Building Debian Linux for the Olimex A13-OLinuXino-MICRO

A13-OLinuXino-MICRO_FTDI

References

https://olimex.wordpress.com/2012/10/12/building-bootable-sd-card-with-debian-linux-image-for-a13-olinuxino/

https://www.olimex.com/forum/index.php?topic=790.0

Install required packages

I like sudo, as it prevents me from doing stupid stuff. However, feel free to use “sudo su” if you don’t feel like typing “sudo” for half the commends. If you just copy and paste the commands, however, it really doesn’t matter. Continue reading